dark mode light mode Search
Search

Berlin’s Holzmarkt 25 Gets a Vibrant Addition with Office ParkScheerbarth’s Red-Timber Building

Haus 2+, Berlin, DE / Office ParkScheerbarth

Jan Bitter

Haus 2+ is truly a standout building in Berlin, with its vibrant red curves and geometric shapes. Designed by the talented architects at Office ParkScheerbarth, this masterpiece is located in the transformed cultural district of Holzmarkt 25.

Haus 2+, Berlin, DE / Office ParkScheerbarth

One of the most striking features of Haus 2+ is its timber structure and eye-catching larch cladding, painted in a bold shade of red. This unique combination of materials and colors beautifully contrasts the surrounding buildings, adding a touch of modernity and liveliness to the area. It’s truly an architectural gem.

Haus 2+, Berlin, DE / Office ParkScheerbarth

The complex and curvy shape of Haus 2+ is made up of simple geometric volumes, offering individual room layouts for its diverse tenants. From a bakery and tattoo studio to a booking agency and artist, a photo studio, and a physiotherapist, this building caters to a variety of businesses.

Haus 2+, Berlin, DE / Office ParkScheerbarth

Despite a tight budget and a small footprint, the architects, Moojin Park and Ben Scheerbarth, maximized space and resource efficiency. They cleverly utilized the existing exterior stairwell of the neighboring concert hall, eliminating the need for additional space for circulation. The building also makes use of an existing basement as a floor slab and the district heating station as its main energy source. The roof terrace seamlessly integrates with Holzmarkt’s open arcades, bridges, and balconies.

Haus 2+, Berlin, DE / Office ParkScheerbarth

Haus 2+ is a true testament to sustainable design. It combines three timber construction systems, with internal walls made from mass timber, slabs from timber box elements, and exterior walls from timber frames. All components are regionally prefabricated and screwed together, allowing for easy disassembly, segregation, and reuse. This aligns perfectly with the cradle-to-cradle principle, echoing Holzmarkt’s roots as a trading port for wood.