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BYRÓ architekti’s Garden Pavilion: A Seamless Connection to Nature

Garden Pavilion, Prague, CZ / BYRÓ architekti

The Garden Pavilion by BYRÓ architekti seamlessly blends indoor and outdoor living in the heart of Prague. Designed for clients with a large, mature garden, this charming structure not only provides shelter from adverse weather and space for summer overnight stays, but also serves as a winter plant storage area.

Garden Pavilion, Prague, CZ / BYRÓ architekti

The pavilion’s standout feature is a folding panel that opens one side completely, creating a seamless transition between the interior and the lush garden outside. Crafted from dark, burnt wood using the shou-sugi-ban technique, the pavilion beautifully complements the surrounding garden cottages, maintaining their romantically imperfect and irregular aesthetic.

Garden Pavilion, Prague, CZ / BYRÓ architekti

The architectural design of the building is meticulously crafted, utilizing a two-by-four construction system with a wooden structure. The interior walls are adorned with plaster, while the rear wall boasts an integrated bookshelf and a ladder leading to the upper floor, all enveloped by a wooden lining. The library and upper floor are adorned with wooden slats, allowing for a gentle diffusion of natural light and creating a unique ambiance.

Garden Pavilion, Prague, CZ / BYRÓ architekti

With windows strategically placed in three directions and a polycarbonate panel, the pavilion boasts a dynamic lighting atmosphere that evolves throughout the day. Despite its modest dimensions of 3 x 5 meters and a height just under 5 meters, the interior space feels open and unrestricted.

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Notably, the Garden Pavilion is self-sufficient, operating independently from utility networks. It relies solely on a photovoltaic panel to meet its electricity needs and provide illumination, showcasing a commitment to sustainable living.

Image courtesy of Alex Shoots Buildings